zlasses
niallssquidgybum
niallssquidgybum:

sad trash hobo stare

niallssquidgybum:

sad trash hobo stare

{16 minutes ago}
zaynyesus
owning-my-truth
AskedHello, I saw you comment on a post about how missionaries in developing countries are ruining the cultures/societies of their people, and it really intrigued me. You see, I am about to go on a trip to Nairobi this coming June with the organization Me To We. Me To We is not religious and I'm not a religious person. But, while there I will help build a school and learn about Maasai culture. Do you feel that service trips without the intention of converting/teaching people are still alienating?

praxis-cat:

owning-my-truth:

I am radically against service trips where people go to “build schools” (or other facilities) in a developing countries, and I find them to be incredibly disempowering and paternalistic at their core. It all boils down to stroking the (usually white) egos of the volunteers to make them feel like “good people” and does NO longterm good for the community.

I just wish people thought more critically about international development and saw through the smoke screen of “aid” that many of these “development” organizations put up as part of the white savior industrial complex. Like it just seems so obvious to me that an organization that goes through all of the logistical and human effort needed to bring “volunteers” to build schools in ~*aFriCa*~ has values that are fundamentally not aligned with those of their communities. They do not have the best interest of locals at heart, at all. 

If they cared about the community, they would be building out local capabilities and talents rather than trying to make a quick buck from western volunteers. They wouldn’t be bringing in untrained (usually) white people from the West without any language skills or understanding of local cultural intricacies to a community that is most at need. Rather than siphoning resources toward making white people “feel good” about themselves and aligning their values with white supremacy and white savior-dom, instead they would be working to give that exact same business to local carpenters and construction workers. Or, worst case, they would bring in people using those same dollars to train community members so that they develop these critical skillsets for themselves and their community at large. Why not actually work in solidarity with a community and build together to improve and develop local capabilities in the longterm? Why must we instead center the white gaze and destructive paternalism, which is disempowering and harmful and only has one longterm impact: making the Western volunteers “feel good” about themselves for “saving the Africans”

It makes me sick.

I also think it’s just so indicative of the deepset narcissism that lies in white supremacy and Western global hegemony that somehow we think that we can “build a school” better than people who are actually from that community. You know the ones who intimately know their needs and those of their communities, far better than the volunteers swooping in for 2 weeks to “save” them. How sick is it that we presume that “expanding our global horizons” can come at any cost, including undermining the fabric of a community, breeding dependency, and pulling resources away from actually building out the longterm capabilities of the people in these communities? I discussed these topics at length with someone who worked in international NGOs for 7 years in Africa and who left incredibly jaded because she saw how the values of so many of these organization was focused on “more NGO, now” rather than doing the more important work of creating communities where the presence of NGOs fades progressively with time as these communities are empowered. 

The structure of the white savior industrial complex is one of disempowerment, damage and harm. Participating in it furthers this destruction and hurts these communities in the long run.

The vast majority of these international aid and development NGOs do not have our best interests at heart, and are simply there to make white people (and other Westerners) feel better for the “good deed” they did once in ~the third world~

It’s horrible.

This post is very important, and while it mentions this, it needs to be stressed that in many cases these charity construction projects are harmful to local economies. Many countries which are destitute are destitute because they are labor-rich and capital-poor, often times because local and national political structures horde capital at the top (and no, this is nothing like WIRD countries having income inequality, and the equation of the two is disguising.)

When you come in and build a school for free, what you’re doing is depriving the people’s largest resource, labor, from being able to turn a profit, and thus, you’re preventing poor people from getting work. If you really care about people AND build schools (where they cannot afford to build their own), then organize a community locally and provide the capital to build that school AND THEN MAINTAIN IT, rather than doing it yourself. That way they can tailor their institutions to their needs, provide work for their workers, and you provide a constant source of employment for teachers, education for children, and a healthier economy. There are also movements to help develop local technologies that can then be produced locally to free up the time of women, who usually bear the brunt of time-intensive tasks which pay poorly.

{2 hours ago}
kayleyhyde
michaelsonn
{2 hours ago}
andwhatyousaid
gyzym

http://andwhatyousaid.tumblr.com/post/83334983433/gyzym-hello-this-is-a-text-post-in-support-of

gyzym:

hello this is a text post in support of bucky barnes: accidental hipster, who wears steve’s huge plaid button-downs over natasha’s too-tight jeans and a pair of old doc martens sam was going to donate to goodwill, because those are the clothes that are around and who gives a shit?…

{2 hours ago}
Look how sweet we’re being.

Look how sweet we’re being.

{3 hours ago}
gloryhalleloujah
koryuoftheriverflow

ifeelbetterer:

torakowalski:

sirona-gs:

But I knew him

……..DONE.

THAT SORT OF CONFUSED NOT-A-SMILE THING HE DOES IN THE LAST GIF. Like “I’m sorry, I know I’m not really a person and I don’t *know* people, but I know him and I don’t understand.”

{3 hours ago}
gloryhalleloujah
nextyearsgirl
skeptikhaleesi:

brownglucose:

nextyearsgirl:

The absence of women in history is man made.

How petty

just look at babe ruth’s face tho
so confused
so lost
i love it

skeptikhaleesi:

brownglucose:

nextyearsgirl:

The absence of women in history is man made.

How petty

just look at babe ruth’s face tho

so confused

so lost

i love it

{4 hours ago}
janetsvandyne
maastrictian
{13 hours ago}
liamwayne
sstyls
{13 hours ago}

The horror movie I just watcher could have used like…….five more script drafts

{13 hours ago}
eisenbergandelephants
spaceysquid

spaceysquid:

whos planning on getting high tomorrow?? not me because im not a DISAPPOINTMENT TO JESUS

{14 hours ago}
thesecondwarm
karakamos

Okay, okay, I’m going to tell you what Hermione sees in Ron.

A trio is a balancing act, right? They’re equalizers of each other. Harry’s like the action, Hermione’s the brains, Ron’s the heart. Hermione has been assassinated in these movies, and I mean that genuinely—by giving her every single positive character trait that Ron has, they have assassinated her character in the movies. She’s been harmed by being made to be less human, because everything good Ron has, she’s been given.

So, for instance: “If you want to kill Harry, you’re going to have to kill me too”—RON, leg is broken, he’s in pain, gets up and stands in front of Harry and says this. Who gets that line in the movie? Hermione.

“Fear of a name increases the fear of the thing itself.” Hermione doesn’t say Voldemort’s name until well into the books—that’s Dumbledore’s line. When does Hermione say it in the movies? Beginning of Movie 2.

When the Devil’s Snare is curling itself around everybody, Hermione panics, and Ron is the one who keeps his head and says “Are you a witch or not?” In the movie, everybody else panics and Hermione keeps her head and does the biggest, brightest flare of sunlight spell there ever was.

So, Hermione—all her flaws were shaved away in the films. And that sounds like you’re making a kick-ass, amazing character, and what you’re doing is dehumanizing her. And it pisses me off. It really does.

In the books, they balance each other out, because where Hermione gets frazzled and maybe her rationality overtakes some of her instinct, Ron has that to back it up; Ron has a kind of emotional grounding that can keep Hermione’s hyper-rationalness in check. Sometimes Hermione’s super-logical nature grates Harry and bothers him, and isn’t the thing he needs even if it’s the right thing, like when she says “You have a saving people thing.” That is the thing that Harry needed to hear, she’s a hundred percent right, but the way she does it is wrong. That’s the classic “she’s super logical, she’s super brilliant, but she doesn’t know how to handle people emotionally,” at least Harry.

So in the books they are this balanced group, and in the movies, in the movies—hell, not even Harry is good enough for Hermione in the movies. No one’s good enough for Hermione in the movies—God isn’t good enough for Hermione in the movies! Hermione is everybody’s everything in the movies.

Harry’s idea to jump on the dragon in the books, who gets it in the movies? Hermione, who hates to fly. Hermione, who overcomes her withering fear of flying to take over Harry’s big idea to get out of the—like, why does Hermione get all these moments?

[John: Because we need to market the movie to girls.]

I think girls like the books, period. And like the Hermione in the books, and like the Hermione in the books just fine before Hollywood made her idealized and perfect. And if they would have trusted that, they would have been just fine.

Would the movies have been bad if she was as awesome as she was in the books, and as human as she was in the books? Would the movies get worse?

She IS a strong girl character. This is the thing that pisses me off. They are equating “strong” with superhuman. To me, the Hermione in the book is twelve times stronger than the completely unreachable ideal of Hermione in the movies. Give me the Hermione in the book who’s human and has flaws any single day of the week.

Here’s a classic example: When Snape in the first book yells at Hermione for being an insufferable know-it-all, do you want to know what Ron says in the book? “Well, you’re asking the questions, and she has to answer. Why ask if you don’t want to be told?” What does he say in the movie? “He’s got a point, you know.” Ron? Would never do that. Would NEVER do that, even before he liked Hermione. Ron would never do that.

"

Melissa Anelli THROWS IT DOWN about the way Ron and Hermione have been adapted in the movies on the latest episode of PotterCast. Listen here. This glorious rant starts at about 49:00. (via karakamos)

Reblog because I love the books and I love Hermione and equating “strong” with “perfect” is one of the worst messages we can give girls.

(via theradicalidea)

{1 day ago}

Anonymous
Askeda friend of mine just told me that she saw a tweet about the steve rogers/bucky barnes ship being called "barnes & noble" and i remembered you. figured you'd appreciate the cuteness too ;D

AHHHHHHHH OH MY GOD!! THIS IS THE BEST MESSAGE TY :*

{1 day ago}
stylinstilinskis
dame-with-a-gun

rainbowrites:

ifeelbetterer:

I really love how this incredibly pale love story is so important to both of them. Peggy in his compass is one of my favorite metaphors EVER (but Steve is always the compass, right, people find due north because of where  he’s pointing).

But tiny!Steve in her desk….UGH, Peggy. If you think back on her interactions with Steve pre-serum—which, what, there were like three—and how they worked I repeat UGH. They were all moments when Steve made himself stand out by being vulnerable—jumping on a grenade, wheezing behind the rest of the runners, pointing out the highlights of his history of being beaten up—and his vulnerability inspired her to offer something personal and true.

What Steve seems to love about Peggy is all bound up in respect and admiration and equality—-WHICH ARE ALL BEAUTIFUL THINGS, I LOVE YOU STEVE. But for Peggy? Loving Steve seems to be about remembering that the weakest man she ever knew was so weak it circled around and became strength. Her memory of Steve is of trying when it seems impossible and, you know, the little guy dripping with hope.

god it just killed me that it was pre-serum Steve in that picture because it was from before he was Captain America. It was from before everyone loved him, when he was nothing but 90 pounds of hope and determination and sass. Because that’s who she loved. It wasn’t Captain America that mattered to her - that guy in the costume with the admittedly AMAZING body wasn’t the reason she kept him in her heart even after she married, even after she forgot so much else. It was Steve Rogers she loved.

I just love that in that tiny moment, they made that distinction. Peggy pointed the way for Steve, and still does - remember he only joined SHIELD because he knew she helped set it up. And one of the reasons she does that for him is that just like Bucky, she loved him and believed in him when he was nothing. When he had nothing else he had Bucky and when no other woman would look twice at him Peggy loved him. Neither of them follow Captain America. Both of them are there for that scrappy boy from Brooklyn who wouldn’t back down from a fight.

{1 day ago}
sidneysussex
haipollai

http://sidneysussex.tumblr.com/post/83140163014/haipollai-steves-best-shirt-is-too-short-in

haipollai:

Steve’s best shirt is too short in the sleeves, his wristbones prominent under pale skin like icebergs in winter (and Steve is like an iceberg, small on the surface but so much more beneath, and also Steve is always cold). He’s wearing a jacket (worn, but warm) indoors because the…

{1 day ago}